Our lives are full of stories, big and small: thrillers, romances, adventure, tragedy and the stories of everyday, seemingly mundane, life. We’ve had stories read to us as children, we’ve shared stories with others, we’ve watched stories unfold in front of our eyes, and we are part of many people’s stories. Each of our lives also fits into God’s story – the greatest ever told.

Some of us love to tell our stories, filled with characters, locations and events, and told with confidence. They bring laughter and light, or take us to a profound place. But some of us may not like telling our stories. We may feel ashamed or nervous; we mumble through because we think we might be misunderstood, judged or silenced.

Our stories may not be straightforward; they have twists and turns, with the good, the bad and the ugly mixed in together, but storytelling is powerful for storyteller and listener alike.

Have you ever wondered what it might be like to have specific storytelling time as a family? It could be once a week in your living room whilst everyone munches biscuits for a treat, or every day of the week just before bedtime, or Sunday afternoon with friends at the park. It could include props, toys, drawing, dressing up and putting on different voices and accents!

A woman shares a verse from the Bible with children in Peru. Photographer: Marc Ewell

‘High-Low’ is one storytelling tool you could use. Family members find some space and take it in turns to tell stories, while everyone else listens. The first round of stories, told by each member in turn, should feature a highlight from the day. The second round is a story featuring a lowlight (a time where the storyteller felt low), and then the third round is where the storyteller suggests where God was at work.

The truth is, telling your stories matter because you matter. Let’s tell more stories.

Tory Martin